CYLINDRICAL PACKAGING

When you are looking at boxes as possibilities for permanent gift packaging, don’t overlook things like these salt and oats containers. These make great gift boxes for things like travel mugs and scarves.

The oat container in this photo already has a lid and is the easier of the two containers to work with, so I will start with it. The basic method of covering the sides of the container with used tissue paper or images from old cards, calendars and magazines works great here without any additional preparation.

The only tricky part on the oat container is the lid. Being plastic, I was concerned that the decoupage glue would not work well on it, but I was pleasantly surprised.  Since I had a number of items on hand that would go in a poinsettia-themed box, I decoupaged the lid in torn pieces from a sheet of used red tissue paper. Then, because I did not believe that I would be stacking anything on top of this particular package, I hot-glued a silk poinsettia (found on a sale rack!) to the top of the lid to act as bow. Most of my boxes have Velcro glued along the sides under the lids to keep the lids in place. This box has the advantage of not needing to have Velcro because the lid stays in place very well on its own.

Something that I can’t remember if I mentioned in previous postings is the packing material that I have been using. This brown shredded paper is something came to me as packing in a food gift some time ago and I continue to use it over and over again each year. Though I do not know of a source for this right off the top of my head, it strikes me that I have seen it offered as a substitute material for the plastic “grass” used in Easter baskets. If you can obtain some of this stuff, it makes wonderful, reusable packing material!

Next time I will post on how to turn the salt container into a wonderful gift box or storage canister!

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This entry was posted in New Life for Cardboard, New Life for Paper, New Life for Plastic Lids and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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